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You're Fired! Part 1 – I Never Saw It Coming

16 November 2009 Written by: Orietta Ramirez 25 Comments
You're Fired!  Part 1 – I Never Saw It Coming

So my day (and it truly became MY day), started that cold, gloomy December morning. It was only 10am but I had been at it since 6:30am. I had just printed out my report of activities and open projects list, and in walks Mr. HR and Mr. Manager. Mr. HR does not make eye contact but immediately sits across from me. Mr. Manager, smiles … ah yes, that smile. Funny, how you selectively remember certain things on those fateful days. As I proceed to pass the reports to each of them, Mr. Manager slides his copy back to me, and says, “We won’t be needing this today” … AGH, turns out, it is my Pink Slip day.

It was December 2008, a typical cold, gloomy day. It was a Thursday. As the BUM (business unit manager) and designated Move Captain, I supported a 200+ group of employees, who were being relocated to offices. Not new offices, but certainly refurbished, and certainly much smaller. Not everyone was happy about the situation, but then again, how many people actually like to move? The move was tomorrow … all under control, she says, as she pulls her hair out, strand by strand!

Add to that angst the fact that I still had to manage, support, supervise and generate normal business activities, ay yay yay! But ok, I always said I was (and still am, I might add) a skilled multi-tasker. Thankfully, I always try to see the humor in any situation, especially the more stressful ones. So yes, this is fun … and will keep saying it, and eventually believe it. Bottom line: I had a job … oh how naïve one can be at times, or maybe it is just plain denial. Either way, ignorance, at times, is bliss.

And so my story goes (and a cliché) … I am preparing my project status report in anticipation of my weekly meeting with the group’s manager. Oddly enough, an HR representative had recently been attending these meetings. Why, do you ask? (I know I did) … well, ahem, says Mr. Manager, we want to make sure the move goes seamlessly especially since you are managing a number of other important projects. What? Guess he forgot I was the point on a number of internal acquisitions in the last year. Add to that, every group was no less than 90% functional on their start day. Here I am a (dynamic – tongue in cheek) bilingual lawyer with years of experience in project and risk management, human capital administration, technology, compliance, as well as supervisory knowledge (ok, ok, tooting my horn, but if not me, then who?). So you now ask, who is she to question senior management? For those who know me, and those who will (or not), you know I did! N.B. see the writing on the wall.

This was a season of financial strife (I think that should have been my first line of this chapter (lol)), so morale, and especially business was not at its peak. My endeavor was to make it possible to survive each business day with a sense of accomplishment and hopefully leave the members of my team with a smile and a sense of satisfaction (don’t you wish more managers thought and acted that way?).

However, this firm, and this Manager did not see it as such. Thanks, for all your help, we appreciate your service, but given the present state of the economy and our business in particular, we have decided to let you go. Fade into numbness, shock, sadness and humiliation.

Please tell me about your “Last Day.” … we all know you remember it very vividly – how different or similar was it to mine? P.S. Does anyone know why it is Pink? Just curious.

Stay tuned for OERamz’s next article “Your Fired! Part 2 – Making a Graceful Exit

Orietta E. Ramírez (pen name OERamz) is a native New Yorker, born in Brooklyn, raised in The Bronx, and presently calls home in Dutchess County, New York. Pedagogically, her claim to fame, as she puts it, is that she shares Cardinal Spellman H.S. as her alma mater with the distinguished Associate Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Fordham University with Vince Lombardi and Steve Bellán, first Latin American to play Major League Baseball, and with Geraldo Rivera, another Brooklyn Law School alum. A first generation Chilean-American, she is a dynamic bilingual lawyer, employee relations advocate and project manager, with experience in human capital administration, audit and risk management. While leveraging her legal and compliance background as an HR partner, she incorporates her expertise on projects and in business relationships with a focus on diversity and inclusion as well as talent management. She is an avid reader and includes salsa dancing among her extracurricular activities, and is always open to all that is intriguing and challenging, which offers new opportunities for thought.


Orietta Ramirez is a native New Yorker, born in Brooklyn, raised in The Bronx, and presently calls home in Dutchess County, New York. Pedagogically, her claim to fame, as she puts it, is that she shares Cardinal Spellman H.S. as her alma mater with the distinguished Associate Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Fordham University with Vince Lombardi and Steve Bellán, first Latin American to play Major League Baseball, and with Geraldo Rivera, another Brooklyn Law School alum. A first generation Chilean-American, she is a dynamic bilingual lawyer, employee relations advocate and project manager, with experience in human capital administration, audit and risk management. While leveraging her legal and compliance background as an HR partner, she incorporates her expertise on projects and in business relationships with a focus on diversity and inclusion as well as talent management. She is an avid reader and includes salsa dancing among her extracurricular activities, and is always open to all that is intriguing and challenging, which offers new opportunities for thought.

You can learn so much about this author by clicking here.

25 Comments »

  • Carrie Corcoran said:

    Hi Orietta,

    I totally feel for you and your situation. It is truly a shock when it is unexpected. I went through the same thing last October as well as this October.

    It does get easier as time goes on, not financially but emotionally. Hang in there and persevere. You sound very talented and have a can do positive attitude which is an asset to any company that may hire you. Remember that things happen for a reason even if you can’t figure out the reason at time.

    I wish you lots of luck in your pursuit of your next great adventure.

    Carrie

  • Maggie Hernandez said:

    Great article :-) Why is the Pink Slip pink? Pink is the color of softness and calm. A way ensure you don’t kill the messenger, maybe? Interesting.

  • Sandy said:

    I loved it. I agree that it’s a shock. Amazing though how alot of managers that delegate manage to keep their job. I’m sure something will come. Good people are hard to find.

  • Antonio Rivera said:

    Great article! I too suffered the trauma of being downsized from a major corporation in 2002. There are little subtle signals that you fail to connect to what’s about to happen: the unannounced visitor at your staff meeting, the redundant questions you explain away by saying to yourself that they forgot what was said or presented, unexplained request for information you have previoulsy provided, the sudden shutdown of information flow in your direction, your staff suddenly are explaining their work and projects to other managers and or project groups. While puzzling, you say to yourself no, not me! I am the ‘go to person’, ‘this has been my baby from day one’, ‘no one else knows more about this than I do’! Then that fateful morning I too was met by my VP with a very nice smile and a comforting tone in her voice. How caring, how humane and how tactless! The punch line, as you know we are having financial difficulties and we decided to let you go. Thank you for your 22 years of loyal service. BTW get your stuff together the two security guards outside your door will ‘help’ you carry your personal belongings to your car.
    But I survived…..and so will you.

  • Carl E. Reid, CSI said:

    Orietta,

    You did a great job of painting a picture of the scene. I look forward to Part 2.

    At this juncture in time, there isn’t any doubt in my mind there a 3 job offers with your name on them right now. If I can assist you with landing, I am at your service.

  • Janet Spittler said:

    Dear Orietta;
    I felt as if being a fly on the wall watching the moments with your distinct writing. Our observations certainly are heightened and memories everlastingly enhanced on the last day of a job that is so unexpected to end abruptly. Realizing your spirit recognizes so many clues of body language voice and energy from the messenger of employment death is a gift from the divine. You are an aware eyes wide open person who can enhance anyones environment and flow of diverse work for those that see the light you carry. May the perfect opportunity appear for you to contribute your wisdom soon.

  • Carole said:

    Hi Ori,

    First of all, great photo!

    I kind of lost you in the 2nd paragraph as I wasn’t sure if you were still talking about your manager or yourself and if you were stating that you were still expected to work after being laid off. Otherwise the writing is good.

  • Sasha said:

    Hi Orietta,

    If I remember correctly my first day at a certain firm will forever be linked with you! Well, I was so excited when I finally left that firm for a better paying job……

    I guess your last name can’t be “Fireman” without a reason. I worked for this restauranteur for two weeks during that same December ’08. First day, sick as a dog. I called the agency but struggled in anyway. The assistant I was to work with was none to happy about me even though I was told that she would be happy to see me. We didn’t speak much but I tried to stay cheerful. I was generally the first one in as the office opened at 10:00 and closed around 8:00pm.

    Second faithful day, I was leaving for work and my rabbit who never leaves my room in the morning just bolted. I was asked to be in early at 9am and I ran after her not knowing what to do. I coaxed her to no avail just sitting their trying to decide between my baby and my new job. Hmmm. I gotta feed the little monster, so I bolted out the door and stressed the day away as she was wedged under my roommates bed with no food or water.

    The week was quite a fright as I was told that “we don’t know what you are going to do here…just fight it out with my other assistant of eight years for what work you can do.” YIKES.

    I made it to the week before Christmas when I was asked to come in on the weekend. I was told to be in at 11:30 then he adjusted it to noon. I woke up at 6am in a cold sweat. I jumped up and started cleaning the house anything to kill time. Ultimately, I had planned to arrive at 11:45. I then realize that my boss was oh-so-old so perhaps he wouldn’t he remember that he changed the time. He only ever referred to me as “that girl.” So, I bolt for the door and jumped in a cab rather than the subway just to get stuck in the worst accident in China Town. When I arrived at noon he was waiting outside his office fuming. He belted out that I was late. I tried to explain as I quickly did the prep work before he could ‘official’ enter his office. Lights at a certain level, temperature at a certain level, dust wiped from the designer glass table. Checked the toilet paper in the private bathroom.

    He called me in after him. “Honey, let me tell you something. In life you should always be 15 minutes early. You are not showing me that you really want this job.” Me, “well, you had said noon and there was this accident.” Him, “Get up earlier!”

    I arrived at 9:45 for the start of biz at 10:00 and was called into the CFO’s office. GOOD BYE

    I guess my bunny was trying to tell me something all along. I have been bouncing around on the sea of tempdom but hope to secure a new job soon.

    Moral of my story? Always listen to your bunnies. I would have hated being called “that girl” for a whole year!

    (\__/)
    (=’.’=) Thanks TahTah Bunny you knew it was not the job for me.
    (“)_(“)

  • uberVU - social comments said:

    Social comments and analytics for this post…

    This post was mentioned on Twitter by CareerJockey: You’re Fired! Why didn’t I see this coming http://ow.ly/D3ho

  • Kamilah said:

    Go Ory!!! Glad to see you writing! Love you!!!

  • Orietta (author) said:

    “At times our own light goes out and is rekindled by a spark from another person.Each of us has cause to think with deep gratitude of those who have lighted the flame within us.” -Albert Schweitzer

    Thank you all for your wonderful feedback and contributions. I am gratified that this first piece has offered an opportunity for us to share what is a momentous (not catastrophic) event in most of our work lives. As one colleague reminded me, there are worse things that can happen. Your words of inspiration are truly appreciated.

    Here’s hoping you’ll come back and read the next excerpt, leaving gracefully (or so I hope), and that you share your final exits with us as well. With appreciation, OERamz.

  • Colleen S. said:

    Oh well written, described and trumpeted! Oh I WISH I had only one layoff story to tell, but I know I am not alone in the creation of my own personal anthology of “Stories of job Separation”. However its done and for whatever reasons if they want the door to hit you as you leave it will – not a lot grace in the vindictiveness of politics vs “personnel management”.

    I liked your story and all its earmarks in your day. I liked how you handled the atrocity of the business climate in December 2008. I liked your brains and your beauty. I liked your compassion and your criticisms. In the end, losing a job is the same and getting a job – its about MONEY. So funny the things people will do to keep you away from the watering hole of severance. So funny.

    I like your sense of humor too and most of all. Yes – people WILL be human. And business is business. You can take it personally if you want to, but don’t ask this business professional how to keep her heart clear of doing the best she can once she is in the employ of anyone…bravo.more.

  • LeAnn said:

    Well written Orietta and I feel your pain. This happened to me in the summer of 2007. I’d had a meeting with our CFO and advised him, after speaking to our HR Director, that I felt our CEO had been involved in some unethical activities. The CFO advised me that I couldn’t say anything because it could “damage his relationship with the CEO.” What?!! Two days later, after speaking again with the HR Director, I got the fateful, “can you come into my office?” request from HR. This didn’t look good because when I entered both the CEO and CFO looked up, smiled and said “your services are no longer needed here.” I tried to explain my side and the CFO said I was lying. I’d never, ever had my morals and ethics called into question. Yikes! I thought that I was protected as a whistleblower but obviously that company didn’t comply with federal regulations. I felt lucky that my HR Director was able to continue my salary for another 10 weeks, but that was it. The boxes were waiting in my office and my computer had already been disconnected. Talk about a shock, I’d never been fired in my life and then to have my ethics in question it was a double blow.

    Anyhow, long story short, after a few years of seething at that organization (I have to drive by it every day), the CEO was fired for misappropriation. I call it just desserts because karma eventually comes back to bite you. I’ve been able to move on and advance my career so I’m feeling good now and you will too. It just takes a while and you have to make sure you give yourself some time to realize that it really wasn’t you or the job you did. It was the situation you were in at the time.

    Thanks for sharing. I feel better just getting my story out too.

    Good luck.

  • Jessica said:

    I have a recent experience to share. But before I go into it, I want to add that I have read a lot of these testamonials about being laid off and I have found that the stories and emotions are so similiar no matter what industry or what level of career.
    In August this year I was laid off from an assistant position. Looking back on it now, the signs were there but I chose to stay in my comfortable bubble and told myself “no way, there is no way they are going to get rid of me – at least not now – not when they need me so much”. After all, who was going to pay the vendors, compile expense reports, book travel, be what they needed me to be on a daily basis? Who?

    Well, it turned out, not me. Not anyone, for that matter.

    The morning it happened I had just finished submitting vendor payments and booking rooms for meetings. My boss walked into my office, looking like he had just walked into a wall, and asked to see me in his office. That’s when I knew. I followed him down the hall with heavy footsteps, walking as slowly as I possibly could to try to put off the inevitable. We got to his office and I briefly stopped at the door to see and HR rep waiting for us…I was right. I kept telling myself, “don’t cry, whatever you do, do not cry!”.
    I sat down with my boss beside me and the rep on the couch in front of me. The rep slowly, mechanically went on to inform me that my services were no longer needed and I was free to go home. Free? I wasn’t free at all! Now I had to face myself, my fears, and everything else that followed.
    I remained professional for the first couple of minutes although I didn’t hear anything they said to me. I glanced at my boss who was clearly upset and that’s when I lost it – completely – for about 45 seconds – shaking, crying…you get the picture. Then I pulled myself together and told them I thought it was important to transition the vendor relationships and files as quickly as possible for the sake of the department and the business. They both looked at me like I was crazy. I guess I can’t blame them. I mean, after all, a moment ago I was crying out of control and now I was all business. The next day I went back in to relinquish my vendors over to my boss and the department manager but I left as quickly and quietly as possible so no one would see me and say things to me like: “I heard…are you okay?” or “We’re gonna miss you around here” or “Do you know where so-and-so is or where I can find this meeting location?”
    Now here I sit at my computer, day after day, examining my resume with a fine-toothed comb, checking the job boards, and learning how the world of job searching has changed – and oh, how it’s changed.

  • Jessica said:

    I have a recent experience to share. But before I go into it, I want to add that I have read a lot of these testamonials about being laid off and I have found that the stories and emotions are so similiar no matter what industry or what level of career.
    In August this year I was laid off from an assistant position. Looking back on it now, the signs were there but I chose to stay in my comfortable bubble and told myself “no way, there is no way they are going to get rid of me – at least not now – not when they need me so much”. After all, who was going to pay the vendors, compile expense reports, book travel, be what they needed me to be on a daily basis? Who?

    Well, it turned out, not me. Not anyone, for that matter.

    The morning it happened I had just finished submitting vendor payments and booking rooms for meetings. My boss walked into my office, looking like he had just walked into a wall, and asked to see me in his office. That’s when I knew. I followed him down the hall with heavy footsteps, walking as slowly as I possibly could to try to put off the inevitable. We got to his office and I briefly stopped at the door to see and HR rep waiting for us…I was right. I kept telling myself, “don’t cry, whatever you do, do not cry!”.
    I sat down with my boss beside me and the rep on the couch in front of me. The rep slowly, mechanically went on to inform me that my services were no longer needed and I was free to go home. Free? I wasn’t free at all! Now I had to face myself, my fears, and everything else that followed.
    I remained professional for the first couple of minutes although I didn’t hear anything they said to me. I glanced at my boss who was clearly upset and that’s when I lost it – completely – for about 45 seconds – shaking, crying…you get the picture. Then I pulled myself together and told them I thought it was important to transition the vendor relationships and files as quickly as possible for the sake of the department and the business. They both looked at me like I was crazy. I guess I couldn’t blame them. I mean, after all, a moment ago I was crying out of control and now I was all business.
    The next day I went back in to relinquish my vendors over to my boss and the department manager but I left as quickly and quietly as possible so no one would see me and say things to me like: “I heard…are you okay?” or “We’re gonna miss you around here” or “Do you know where so-and-so is or where I can find this meeting location?”
    Now here I sit at my home computer, day after day, examining my resume with a fine-toothed comb, checking the job boards, and learning how the world of job searching has changed – and oh, how it’s changed.

  • Debbie said:

    I was the “clean up girl”. Recruited from school district to school district to bring order to technology in the district. Schools finally understood the importance of technology to a $100m organization and how it permeates all areas – from the business office, bus transportation, food service, payroll, human resources and of course the principals, teachers and students. My business background coupled with my strong project management and people management skills made me the the perfect “clean up girl”. And I was flattered, constantly being wooed and recruited.

    On my fateful day… it was the Tuesday following Mother’s Day, I was summoned to the Superintendent’s office in the morning. Typical request. When I arrived, the Superintendent, Human Resources Director and School Solicitor (lawyer) were seated waiting for me. Still not phased – I uncover a lot of legal issues – employee and student computer theft, etc. Then, like you, I notice that none of the three will look me in the eye. Yeah… I “never saw it coming”. The solicitor turns to me and tells me that serious charges have been filed against me by one of my employees. The next few minutes felt surreal. I couldn’t believe this was actually happening. It seemed like a big and very evil joke. He went on to tell me that one of the technicians working for me filed a sexual harassment charge against me. I flashed back to the weekend I spent on Mother’s Day feeling so blessed to be the mother of 3 bright, handsome and caring teenage boys. So the next several minutes was a bunch of “blah blah blah” like a Charlie Brown show. He was talking to me but like an out of body experience, all I could think about was that I was a happily married, slightly old, slightly frumpy woman who was raising 3 teenage boys and was the “den mother” and manager of a bright and beautiful team of technical support staff. Incapable of harassment and especially anything of a sexual nature. I was proud of my team and all we had accomplished over the last two years. It was as though we banded together fought against every obstacle and succeeded in making miracles out of a mess. They took my laptop computer, my badge and my keys and walked me to my car like a criminal.

    I was on paid leave of absence while they investigated. I sobbed for days trying to figure out what just happened. Why one of my guys would charge me with such serious allegations without ever giving me a warning. Sure I was a loving, caring, hugging kind of “den mother” type but sexual harassment? And slowly I realized that the allegations were ridiculous and unfounded. I’m so naive. So then I wondered why my supervisor didn’t dismiss the stupidity and support me. And slowly I realized that my supervisor didn’t dismiss the charges because she was part of the process to force me out. I’m so naive. After weeks of humiliation and paranoia, the district offered me a severance package if I resigned. I agreed, happy to be out of there and put all of the pain, betrayal and abandonment behind me.

    It’s been six months and the pain, bitterness and resentment is still there. Compounded by the fact that I have been unable to find another job. Can’t even get a call for an interview. I’ve always been able to reflect on the past and improve myself. This time, however, I have replayed the events thousands of times and can’t see where I went wrong. Except for the fact that I worked so hard and gave so much of my time and myself to that organization and those people.

    I more clearly see the characters… I see the union official that I caught red handed with a district laptop computer. I see the retiring business manager with the beef against me, emotional issues and an ego. I see the technician suffering from a few personal issues and a little threatened by my passion to improve performance when he was on another track, just trying to finish his studies and get out of a job he was not happy in. I see the new superintendent angry with my outcries for help in dealing with the business administrator over the years. I see the connections between all of them… I see the loyalty, the friendship and the past love affair between the technician and the union official. I see a similar loyalty between the Superintendent and the business administrator. I see the debts owed and threats between the four of them.

    What I don’t see is why I was the one caught in the cross-hairs. I don’t see how this couldn’t have all gone so bad. I don’t see how NO ONE would stand up and stop the nonsense. I’m so naive.

    I wish I would have been laid off like you. I would still be job hunting. My ego would still be wounded. But I wouldn’t be so conflicted about good and evil. Yes… I wish I was laid off.

  • Claudia Rivera said:

    Ori, I really enjoyed reading your article. Your introduction is sharp and your choice of words clearly describe the tension that is about to unfold. Your craft is unique. You cleverly weave in your voice throughout the narration, so it feels as if you are speaking directly at the reader. I especially liked the vivid depictions of Mr. HR and Mr. Manager. I can feel your frustration, dedication and optimism throughout the piece. I look forward to reading part two. Sending you much love and positive energy!!!

  • Momma Nature - Carole Yancey said:

    Ahh! Been there done that, have TWO teeshirts. The first blast of hate and dismissal (literally) was my first job out of college. Since I had put myself through college without any parental aid or support on any level, it was the most important thing in my life. Yes, it was underpaid but I worked with children in a daycare and loved them and the job. My parents had divorced when I was a junior in college and both had left town, leaving me sans family so that job was my family.

    The boss fired me two weeks before a six month “trial period.” Apparently, according to her, one of my closest childhood friends had called the state office in NC to comment negatively on the ratio of students to teachers. Finding out that my friend had betrayed me, (she later denied doing so) plus losing all my income was a jolt that changed the course of my life.Realizing I was jobless, without any family and alone in a society that seemed closed against me was overwhelming. Only my belief in God kept me going. Thankfully, my landlord was a lovely lady who really cared for me and reduced my rent on the one bedroom apartment I’d had for two years.

    I quickly took secretarial classes and, over the next many years, became a fine executive secretary. At least the work was definable and less subjective than daycare where one woman had total power.

    You will be just fine over the years. Your voice is very important and I applaud you and your spirit! Being fired is quickly becoming a rite of passage for us all, at least you and I are ahead of the game and major survivors!

    Blessings,
    Momma Nature
    Carole Yancey

  • Orietta (author) said:

    I was torn between two quotes .. so I went with both, for I am humbled and grateful for your incredible, wondrous and poignant comments and contributions, Thank you!:

    The art of life is to know how to enjoy a little and to endure very much ~ William Hazlitt

    Life’s not always fair. Sometimes you can get a splinter even sliding down a rainbow. ~ Cherralea Morgen

    Your commentaries resonate with the pain, sorrow, horror, disbelief, sense of betrayal, angst, and utter humanness (I think I just made that word up or at least misspelled it; maybe humanity would be more appropriate, but you know what I mean – lol). And, this is what will make you whole, with time.

    As mentioned, there is similitude in our stories, and for many of you, you will see yourselves in the next piece once again, as I experienced the “exact” same thoughts/reactions … thought of re-editing but opted to leave the truth in tact (no plagiarism here!).

    Cannot wait to read your thoughts and feedback on the next piece. Please keep your stories coming, we all need to be heard — we are all brothers-and-sisters at arms!

  • Adriana Cole said:

    Ori, this was a great piece and I’m dying to read part 2. Your article described all the angst and confusion that most people that lost their jobs this year have gone through. It’s a terrible thing to feel blind-sided, but you will see how this situation will make you stronger and will probably open doors to new and more exciting opportunities.

  • Your Fired! Currently Lookin' - Making a Graceful Exit | Career Jockey said:

    […] article continues where OERamz’s first article “You’re Fired! Part 1- I Never Saw It Coming left […]

  • Rod Colon said:

    Orietta,

    Nice job and well written!

    I empathize with the article and with so many others who have been in the same place. As a former HR Manager I sat in the HR role many times and this is why I left corporate and share the article below – it is so so important.

    Commit To It Then Hold Yourself Accountable

    The key to developing ME, Inc. is the idea of reframing the self-image of the employee (or job seeker) from the powerless “employee” to the powerful, in-charge CEO of ME, Inc.

    The following passage is a commitment pledge I drafted to help me internalize the shift in thinking from employee to business owner for my own Personal Board of Directors. Maybe it will give you some ideas for developing your own commitment pledge and holding yourself accountable for seeing it through:

    As CEO of Rod, Inc, I have responsibilities to run my business for the benefit of my Board of Directors (Maria, Rod III, Nick, Alicia and extended family). I have business decisions to make geared at maximizing my profitability in selling my value proposition.

    I have no excuses, just a business to run. Jobs, employers, layoffs, etc. are not personal, just part of business. I do not think of “giving an honest day’s work for a day’s pay” (although I do that and more). Instead, I am a business owner providing an honest service at a good price to a valued client.

    In order to get a client, I need to establish my value proposition, evaluate the geographic market for what I am selling (my skills and experience), and understand that I may need to modify one or the other depending on supply and demand. In general, as a business, I need:

    1) Something productive to do on Monday morning that I’m looking forward to on Sunday night
    2) A back-up plan
    3) Multiple sources of income that do not conflict with my primary source of income
    4) A network of at least 200 people that I care about and who care about me

  • Jorge Lazaro Diaz
    Jorge Lazaro Diaz said:

    Rod,

    Thanks for your last comment. The CEO of Me mentality is one that can keep us focused on what’s really important – that is the people we love and depend upon us. It has the added benefit that it throws us into the drivers seat responsible for our own future as opposed to being victims at the whims of “the corporation.”

    When I came up with the Career Jockey byline, “Ride your career hard so it doesn’t ride you!” that’s the approach I actively promote.

    Looking forward to future interaction with you.

    Jorge Lazaro Diaz, The “Original” Career Jockey

  • Christmas Greetings from Orietta Ramirez | Career Jockey said:

    […] you return to read the next chapter in the “You’re Fired!” series which will be published soon. Special note of thanks to Jorge, the Career Jockey editor who has […]

  • Job Seeker Happiness Is... | CareerJockey said:

    […] came when I posted the first two articles last week. (You can find those articles at “You’re Fired!” and “What Do You Mean I Need a College Degree?”) In four days, both articles made it to the […]

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